cracked:

So if Flashdance is a movie about a dancer, why isn’t the cornerstone of the soundtrack called something like, ya know, “Dancer”?
5 Classic Songs That Were Originally Creepy as Hell

#3. “Maniac” Was About a Serial Killer
Songwriters Dennis Matkosky and Michael Sembello originally wrote the song about an actual maniac — as in, a person who murders other people for terrifyingly little reason. You see, Matkosky and Sembello had been hired to pen songs for Flashdance, but sat down to watch television instead, because it’s hard to write dance music when you just aren’t in the mood. Matkosky happened to catch a news report about a guy who had killed a bunch of people and buried them in his yard, and was suddenly struck with a lightning bolt of divine inspiration.
Flashdance Version:
She’s a maniac, maniac on the floor
And she’s dancing like she’s never danced before
Original Version:
He’s a maniac, maniac, he just moved next door
He’ll kill your cat and nail it to the floor

Read More

cracked:

So if Flashdance is a movie about a dancer, why isn’t the cornerstone of the soundtrack called something like, ya know, “Dancer”?

5 Classic Songs That Were Originally Creepy as Hell

#3. “Maniac” Was About a Serial Killer

Songwriters Dennis Matkosky and Michael Sembello originally wrote the song about an actual maniac — as in, a person who murders other people for terrifyingly little reason. You see, Matkosky and Sembello had been hired to pen songs for Flashdance, but sat down to watch television instead, because it’s hard to write dance music when you just aren’t in the mood. Matkosky happened to catch a news report about a guy who had killed a bunch of people and buried them in his yard, and was suddenly struck with a lightning bolt of divine inspiration.

Flashdance Version:

She’s a maniac, maniac on the floor

And she’s dancing like she’s never danced before

Original Version:

He’s a maniac, maniac, he just moved next door

He’ll kill your cat and nail it to the floor

Read More

250 notes

feynificent:

Happy Birthday Penelope Athena Richmond [August 10,2011]

387 notes

apocalarious:

pli1018:

This makes me so emotional.

The first thing I “designed” for the show, (aside from arranging Trollz in Kathy Geiss’ office) was the Glad office that Tracy mistakenly calls in Season 6. The set was only a quick cutaway and was intentionally as basic as it could be, but it meant the world that I was given this “assignment” during my second week on the show.

When we watched the episode at lunch and the scene aired, I audibly yelped. Seconds later I was completely taken aback when my art department colleagues cheered loudly for me. I think even Alec cracked a smile at that.

That was when I knew I was really home.

STOP.

(Source: feyminism)

1,348 notes

cinephiliabeyond:

“I remember discussions I had with Robby Müller about the implications of starting a shot like a p.o.v. and then the person that’s supposedly looking enters the shot himself — yeah, not herself, it’s always himself — and we discussed the meaning of it, that strange switch of position. Most of my films are exclusively designed from somebody’s point-of-view, like for example The Goalie’s Fear, also Paris Texas, so to break the pattern every now and then, and very rarely of course, is a sort of a mental jump. I always liked it because I think it does something to the person watching just as it does something for the character seeing from the point-of-view. It creates a strange distance all of a sudden and it turns the point-of-view from the character back to the audience, i.e. everybody who is watching the film. Every single pair of eyes that is looking at the film all of a sudden becomes the new point-of-view. The point-of-view is passed on to the audience. They first think this is what Trevor is seeing and all of a sudden it’s what they are seeing. That was always the thing I tried to do: to pass on the p.o.v. to the audience.” —Wim Wenders
An interview with Wim Wenders about Paris, Texas. The second video is a gem, “Wim Wenders Hollywood April ’84,” a segment from the French television program Cinéma cinémas, showing Wenders and composer Ry Cooder at work on the score. The DVD/Blu-ray of the film, with DTS-HD Master Audio soundtrack (on the Blu-ray edition), is available at the Criterion Collection. Absolutely our highest recommendation.


What happened was, we got to the point where Harry Dean talked to Nastassja for the last time, to tell her the story of their life. He’d seen her before and sort of ran away. So Wim called Sam and said, “Okay, so here’s where we are, here’s what happened.” And Sam said, “Okay, let me write this.” So he wrote the speech, Harry Dean’s speech, and dictated it on the phone to the script girl, who then typed it up. Then it got to Harry Dean, who went nuts. He had to talk to Sam, he had to talk to Sam. So he talked to Sam, and Sam said, “Just. Say. The. Words. It’s all there.” And it was. And it is. When we shot that scene, Harry Dean had the right to call “cut” if he was fumbling. So we shot it all day long, and he kept calling “cut.” And he finally got it from the beginning to the end without any break. It’s funny; it was a giant hit overseas. When it was distributed in England, the distributor printed T-shirts, and what was on the T-shirt was the speech. The whole fucking speech. —L.M. Kit Carson


For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

//

cinephiliabeyond:

“I remember discussions I had with Robby Müller about the implications of starting a shot like a p.o.v. and then the person that’s supposedly looking enters the shot himself — yeah, not herself, it’s always himself — and we discussed the meaning of it, that strange switch of position. Most of my films are exclusively designed from somebody’s point-of-view, like for example The Goalie’s Fear, also Paris Texas, so to break the pattern every now and then, and very rarely of course, is a sort of a mental jump. I always liked it because I think it does something to the person watching just as it does something for the character seeing from the point-of-view. It creates a strange distance all of a sudden and it turns the point-of-view from the character back to the audience, i.e. everybody who is watching the film. Every single pair of eyes that is looking at the film all of a sudden becomes the new point-of-view. The point-of-view is passed on to the audience. They first think this is what Trevor is seeing and all of a sudden it’s what they are seeing. That was always the thing I tried to do: to pass on the p.o.v. to the audience.” Wim Wenders

An interview with Wim Wenders about Paris, Texas. The second video is a gem, “Wim Wenders Hollywood April ’84,” a segment from the French television program Cinéma cinémas, showing Wenders and composer Ry Cooder at work on the score. The DVD/Blu-ray of the film, with DTS-HD Master Audio soundtrack (on the Blu-ray edition), is available at the Criterion Collection. Absolutely our highest recommendation.

What happened was, we got to the point where Harry Dean talked to Nastassja for the last time, to tell her the story of their life. He’d seen her before and sort of ran away. So Wim called Sam and said, “Okay, so here’s where we are, here’s what happened.” And Sam said, “Okay, let me write this.” So he wrote the speech, Harry Dean’s speech, and dictated it on the phone to the script girl, who then typed it up. Then it got to Harry Dean, who went nuts. He had to talk to Sam, he had to talk to Sam. So he talked to Sam, and Sam said, “Just. Say. The. Words. It’s all there.” And it was. And it is. When we shot that scene, Harry Dean had the right to call “cut” if he was fumbling. So we shot it all day long, and he kept calling “cut.” And he finally got it from the beginning to the end without any break. It’s funny; it was a giant hit overseas. When it was distributed in England, the distributor printed T-shirts, and what was on the T-shirt was the speech. The whole fucking speech. L.M. Kit Carson

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

37 notes

cinephiliabeyond:

Cinéma cinémas is a brilliant cinema magazine broadcast on Antenne 2 from January 1982 to November 1991, produced by the director Claude Ventura, journalist Anne Andreu and critic Michel Boujut.

A magnificent interview with legendary cinematographer Stanley Cortez on shooting The Night of the Hunter  and working with Charles Laughton.
Stanley Cortez
Orson Welles
Wim Wenders
The spy Selznick
Elisha Cook Jr.
Peter Ustinov double
Westmore of Hollywood
Sterling Hayden
Edward Dmytryk
Jack Nicholson
Mickey Rourke
Chan Parker

Hitchcock Special: James Stewart
Hitchcock Special: Peggy Robertson
Hitchcock Special: Tippi Hedren
Hitchcock Special: North by Northwest
Hitchcock Special: Robert Boyle
Hitchcock Special: Anthony Perkins
Hitchcock Special: Chabrol, an interview
Hitchcock Special: Le cassoulet & Hitchcock
Hitchcock Special: Hitchcock s’explique
Hitchcock Special: Janet Leigh

Francis Ford Coppola
Otto Preminger
Richard Brooks
Josef von Sternberg
Samuel Fuller
Buster Keaton
Roman Polanski
Charles Bukowski
Mel Brooks
Dustin Hoffman
Russ Meyer
James Ellroy

John Cassavetes
Vincent Price
Burt Reynolds
Richard Fleischer
Jack Lemmon
Aki Kaurismäki
Samuel Fuller
Woody Allen
Frank Capra
Peter Falk
Clint Eastwood
Ingmar Bergman

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

//

cinephiliabeyond:

Cinéma cinémas is a brilliant cinema magazine broadcast on Antenne 2 from January 1982 to November 1991, produced by the director Claude Ventura, journalist Anne Andreu and critic Michel Boujut.

A magnificent interview with legendary cinematographer Stanley Cortez on shooting The Night of the Hunter  and working with Charles Laughton.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

239 notes

Ingmar Bergman: No other art-medium—neither painting nor poetry—can communicate the specific quality of the dream as well as the film can. When the lights go down in the cinema and this white shining point opens up for us, our gaze stops flitting hither and thither, settles and becomes quite steady. We just sit there, letting the images flow out over us. Our will ceases to function. We lose our ability to sort things out and fix them in their proper places. We’re drawn into a course of events—we’re participants in a dream… Sometimes while I’m dreaming I think: “I’ll remember this, I’ll make a film of it”—it’s a sort of occupational disease.

Luis Buñuel: If someone were to tell me I had twenty years left, and ask me how I’d like to spend them, I’d reply: “Give me two hours a day of activity, and I’ll take the other twenty-two in dreams… provided I can remember them.”

1,243 notes

truthandmovies:

TRAILER: “BIRDMAN” (Alejandro González Iñárritu) 2014

"How did we end up here, in this dump?"

Iñárritu’s career could go any number of ways from here, but this *terrific* glimpse at his first (predominately) english-language feature suggests that it might be to the skies. 

241 notes

Sophia Loren, Sylvie Vartan, Elsa Martinelli, Anna Karina, Jean-Paul Belmondo, Jane Fonda, Catherine Deneuve, Virna Lisi & Yvette Mimieux by Willy Rizzo, 1966

586 notes